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Athletes

Jonathan
Paredes
MexicoMexico, MEX
High diving

Biography

Further Personal Information

Date of birth
14 August 1989
Height
165 cm
Weight
62 kg
Family
Wife Noelia
Residence
Madrid, ESP
Occupation
Athlete
Languages
English, Spanish

Sport Specific Information

When and where did you begin this sport?
He took up high diving in 2005, have previously competed in traditional diving since age six.
Why this sport?
At age six he was enrolled into swimming lessons at a municipal swimming pool in Naucalpan, Mexico. "The divers always drew my attention, watching them doing all those spectacular twists." At age 15 he was invited to perform at a diving show in an amusement park in Mexico City, Mexico. Years later, Mexican diver Fernando Platas, one of those he used to watch in Naucalpan, invited him to perform in cliff diving events in Mexico. "I had so much fear. I didn't know what to expect.".
Name of coach
Ramon Fumado [personal], VEN; Luis Huerta [personal], MEX
Training Regime
For the 2019 season, he trained in Guadalajara, Mexico, with coach Luis Huerta, as well as in Madrid, Spain, with coach Ramon Fumado.

General Interest

Nicknames
Jonny (Facebook profile, 18 Jan 2017)
Hobbies
Watching football, going to the cinema, listening to hip-hop music. (24-horas.mx, 14 Jul 2016)
Hero / Idol
Colombian high diver Orlando Duque. (redbullcliffdiving.com, 17 Feb 2016)
Injuries
He has sustained minor injuries to his lower back, knees and neck throughout his career. (excelsior.com.mx, 03 Jun 2019)
Superstitions / Rituals / Beliefs
Before a dive he crosses himself and counts from three to one. (excelsior.com.mx, 03 Jun 2019)
Sporting philosophy / motto
"Be a better athlete, be a better person." (redbullcliffdiving.com, 17 Feb 2016)
Other information
DEALING WITH FEAR
Despite being a professional cliff diver he says he cannot relinquished fear. "When you lose the fear of what you are doing, you lose respect for it. It's like driving a car while being drunk, you are not respecting your life any more, and that's not good." He says the worst moment is to walk to the platform. "[There] you ask yourself, 'Why am I doing this?' A voice in your head tells you to stop. You think of the risk, in fractures, in getting unconscious, or being dragged by a wave or a river current. You think that you can die there. Once you get up there everything is gone. It is you and the platform." (maspormas.com, 09 Mar 2018; hidrocalidodigital.com, 30 Jun 2019)